Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Key Findings from the KASB Other Staff Survey Report

KASB recently released the 2016 KASB Other Staff Survey Annual Report.  This report includes the data reported by Kansas Public School Districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to Classified and other staff from the 1995-96 school year through the 2015-16 school year.

The KASB Other Staff Survey is new beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Classified Salary and Wage and Teacher Contract Details Surveys.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.

Here are some key findings from the report:
  • From 1995-96 to 2015-16:
    • The average number of custodians per district decreased 18 percent from 11.1 to 9.1 in 2015-16.  
    • Head custodians increased 5 percent from 4.0 to 4.2.  
    • Other building clerical positions decreased 10 percent from 8.0 to 7.2.  
    • Building secretary positions decreased 8 percent from 6.5 to 6.0 per district.
    • Central office clerical staff decreased 13 percent from 4.3 to 3.7.  
    • Central office secretaries decreased 23 percent from 3.6 to 2.8 per district.
    • Food service cooks decreased 22 percent from 8.9 per district to 6.9.  
    • Food servers decreased 18 percent from 13.0 to 10.7.  
    • Non-licensed maintenance decreased 38 percent from 5.2 per district to 3.2.  
    • Licensed maintenance increased 17 percent from 3.5 to 4.1.
    • Non-special education paraprofessionals increased 19 percent from 13.0 per district to 15.5.  
    • Special education paraprofessionals increased 110 percent from 42.1 per district to 88.6 per.
  • From 1996-97 to 2015-16:
    • Building custodian starting hourly wages increased 50 percent from $6.75 to $10.12, average wages increased 47 percent from $8.07 to $11.85, annual salaries increased 42 percent from $16,364 to $23,198, and fringe benefits increased 229 percent from $1,617 to $5,313.  
    • Head custodian starting wages increased 57 percent from $7.73 to $12.16, average wages increased 49 percent from $10.05 to $14.99 annual salaries increased 46 percent from $21,790 to $31,751, and fringe benefits increased 233 percent from $1,699 to $5,651.  
    • Building clerical starting wages increased 61 percent from $6.53 to $10.55, average wages increased 62 percent from $7.79 to $12.63, annual salaries increased 68 percent from $11,377 to $19,068, and fringe benefits increased 238 percent from $1,464 to $4,943.  
    • Building secretary starting wages increased 58 percent from $6.74 to $10.67, average wages increased 52 percent from $8.60 to $13.11, annual salaries increased 58 percent from $14,810 to $23,438, and fringe benefits increased 253 percent from $1,525 to $5,378.
    • Central office clerical starting wages increased 71 percent from $7.20 to $12.32, average salaries increased 75 percent from $8.92 to $15.62, annual salaries increased 79 percent from $16,386 to $29,304, and fringe benefits increased 225 percent from $1,492 to $4,844.  
    • Central office secretary starting wages increased 65 percent from $7.45 to $10.67, average wages increased 64 percent from $9.42 to $15.50, annual salaries increased 65 percent from $18,610 to $30,752, and fringe benefits increased 217 percent from $1,597 to $5,069.  
    • Cook starting wages increased 54 percent from $6.28 to $9.67, average wages increased 48 percent from $7.94 to $11.76, annual salaries increased 50 percent from $10,441 to $15,698, and fringe benefits increased 258 percent from $1,442 to $5,162.  
    • Food server starting wages increased 55 percent from $6.05 to $9.35, average wages increased 49 percent from $7.03 to $10.48, annual salaries increased 40 percent from $7,259 to $10,160, and fringe benefits increased 246 percent from $1,317 to $4,562.
    • Non-licensed maintenance staring wages increased 54 percent from $8.35 to $12.88, average wages increased 57 percent from $10.59 to $16.68, annual salaries increased 53 percent from $22,291 to $34,109, and fringe benefits increased 224 percent from $1,632 to $5,279.  
    • Licensed maintenance starting wages increased 89 percent from $9.01 to $17.02, average wages increased 87 percent from $11.54 to $21.58, annual salaries increased 83 percent from $24,688 to $45,065, and fringe benefits increased 268 percent from $1,567 to $5,760.  
    • Non-special education para-professional starting wages increased 55 percent from $5.99 to $9.25, average wages increased 61 percent from $6.97 to $11.20, annual salaries increased 65 percent from $8,337 to $13,741, and fringe benefits increased 266 percent from $13,53 to $4,948.  
    • Special education para-professional starting wages increased 60 percent from $6.06 to $9.71, average wages increased 62 percent from $7.12 to $11.56, annual salaries increased 61 percent from $8,432 to $13,574, and fringe benefits increased 353% from $1,317 to $5,974. 
    • Average hours per year have remained fairly consistent, with building custodians averaging around 2,000 hours per year, building head custodians 2,125, building clerical 1,500, building secretaries 1,700, central office clerical 1,850, central office secretaries 2,000, cooks 1,300, food servers 975, non-licensed maintenance 2,100, licensed maintenance 2,100, non-special education para-professionals 1,200, and special education para-professionals 1,200.
    • Annual vacation leave allocations have remained fairly consistent, with 11.0 days for building custodians, 11.6 for building head custodians, 8.9 for building clerical, 9.6 for building secretaries, 11.5 for central office clerical, 11.8 for central office secretaries, 6.5 for cooks, 6.7 for food servers, 11.3 for non-licensed maintenance, 11.3 for licensed maintenance, 4.8 for non-special education para-professionals, and 4.2 for special education paraprofessionals. 
    • Annual medical leave allocations have remained fairly consistent, with 11.5 days for building custodians, 11.7 for building head custodians, 10.3 for building clerical, 10.6 for building secretaries, 11.7 for central office clerical, 11.7 for central office secretaries, 9.9 for cooks, 9.6 for food servers, 11.6 for non-licensed maintenance, 12.1 for licensed maintenance, 9.8 for non-special education para-professionals, and 9.9 for special education para-professionals.
  • From 1996-97 to 2012-13 around 20 percent of districts indicate they met with classified staff to determine the terms and conditions of employment.
  • Over 60 percent of districts indicated the superintendent recommended the terms and conditions of employment between 2001-02 and 2012-13. 
  • An increasing number of districts (from a little over 0 percent in 2000-01 to over 30 percent in 2013-14) indicate that the classified staff see the same percent increase as teachers each year.  
  • Between 2000-01 and 2012-13:
    • Less than 10 percent of districts reported some other means of determining terms and conditions of employment for classified employees. 
    • The percent of districts reporting that nurses were paid according to the teacher salary schedule remained around 25 percent.
  • The number of regular drivers per district has been reported consistently between 10 and 12 drivers until 2015-16, when this number dropped to about 9 per district.  The number of special drivers has been consistently between 4 and 6 per district.
  • From 2001-02 to 2015-16:
    • Regular bus driver hourly rates increased 45 percent from $9.85 to $14.24 and per trip rates increased 60 percent from $14.07 to $22.45.  Special bus driver hourly rates increased 51 percent from $7.48 to $11.27.
    • The average number of full-time nurses employed decreased 27 percent from 3.3 to 2.4 and the average number of part-time nurses employed increased 40 percent from 1.5 to 2.1 per district.  
    • Starting hourly wages for nurses increased 34 percent from $15.05 to $20.19 and the average hourly wages increased 39 percent from $16.39 to $22.73. 
    • The average amount spent on contract nursing services increased 98 percent from $19,861 to $39,401.
  • From 2006-07 to 2015-16:
    • Per mile rates for regular bus drivers decreased 13 percent from $0.45 to $0.39, and for special bus drivers decreased 31 percent from $0.54 to $0.37.
    • The number of contracted full-time nurses increased 17 percent from 1.4 to 1.6 per district.
In addition to the report, KASB released The following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:
The report as well as the tools mentioned can be found at kasbresearch.org.  Questions on the report and data can be sent to research@kasb.org.    

Thursday, December 8, 2016

KSDE State Assessment Data Summary and Analysis Tool


KSDE recently released the 2016 state assessment results on their new Data Central data page (http://datacentral.ksde.org/).  KASB has taken that data and placed it into a new interactive tool for members and others to use.  The tool (which can be found here: https://public.tableau.com/views/KSDE_Assessments/Overview) allows users to filter by program year (2015 or 2016), district, school building, student group (by race, free/reduced lunch status, etc.), subject, and grade level.

The following is a high-level analysis of the 2016 data including some trends and things to watch for.

Overall 


ELA
MATH
Level Four
10.17
9.83
Level Three
31.16
24.61
Level Two
35.32
39.21
Level One
23.33
26.33


As the table and chart above show, approximately 25 percent of all students in the state (including public schools and accredited private schools) performed at Level One, which is defined by KSDE as "student is not performing at grade-level standards."  So around one in four students in Kansas is not performing at grade level.  

About 35 percent of students in language and 40 percent in math are performing at Level Two, which includes students "doing grade-level work as defined by the standards but not at the depth or level of rigor to be considered on-track for college success."  This means that over half of the students in Kansas are not on-track for college success.

Around 30 percent of students in language and 25 percent in math are performing at Level Three, which indicates "the student is performing at academic expectations for that grade and is on track to being college ready," and about 10 percent in both subjects are performing at Level Four, which indicates " the student is performing above expectations and is on-track to being college ready."

Taking this all together, we can see that the Kansas Education System needs to address the needs of the students performing at Levels One and Two if we want to prepare students for success after graduation whether or not they plan any form of postsecondary education.

The data can be examined in much more detail using the tool noted above.  For our purposes, we will look at the difference in performance by grade level, by National School Lunch Program participation status, and by Race/Ethnicity.  

Grade Level

ELA
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Level Four
16.16
13.85
17.32
6.51
6.39
4.78
5.66
Level Three
29.43
39.18
28.75
34.98
32.99
26.25
26.27
Level Two
31.84
33.13
32.14
30.89
33.85
45.57
40.28
Level One
22.55
13.82
21.77
27.6
26.76
23.38
27.77
MATH
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Level Four
18.1
10.25
12.43
9.89
4.99
5.77
6.86
Level Three
35.96
27.13
22.56
23.02
25.62
19.93
17.32
Level Two
30.75
46.1
38.41
41.79
48.41
34.15
34.95
Level One
15.17
16.5
26.58
25.27
20.96
40.13
40.84



The data by grade level shows some notable trends.  

For both language and math, there are higher percentages of students performing at level four in the earlier grades, suggesting the number of students exceeding expectations decreases as they move through the system.  

The percentage of students performing below grade level (Level One) remains fairly consistent for ELA, but shows a large increase for MATH in the higher grades.

The data suggests that 75 percent of students in grade 10 are not on track for college success in mathematics, and that 68 percent of students in grade 10 are not on track for college success in language arts.  

On the other hand, 60 percent of students in grade 10 are on track to graduate in mathematics, and 72 percent are on track to graduate in language arts.  

National School Lunch Program Participation


ELA
MATH
Free/Reduced
Full Price
Diff
Free/Reduced
Full Price
Diff
Level Four
4.39
15.59
11.2
3.86
15.43
11.57
Level Three
22.24
39.53
17.29
16.76
31.98
15.22
Level Two
38.57
32.27
-6.3
41.84
36.75
-5.09
Level One
34.78
12.59
-22.19
37.52
15.82
-21.7




According to this data, there is a 22 percent gap between students performing at Level One for both ELA and MATH, and a 5 or 6 percent gap between students performing at Level Two for both groups based on their free or reduced-price lunch status.

In addition, there is a 17 percent gap for ELA and a 15 percent gap for MATH on Level Three between the two groups, and an 11 or 12 percent gap on Level Four.

This suggests that students from more affluent families perform notably better than their less economically advantaged peers.

Race/Ethnicity


ELA African
American
Am Indian
or AK Native
Asian Hispanic Multi Native HI or
Pacific Islander
White
Level Four 3.02 6.24 18.66 4.14 9.42 6.89 12.41
Level Three 16.36 24.57 37.09 21.08 30.15 27.05 35.52
Level Two 35.9 38.97 27.23 38.9 36.3 41.64 34.43
Level One 44.7 30.2 17 35.86 24.1 24.4 17.62
MATH African
American
Am Indian
or AK Native
Asian Hispanic Multi Native HI or
Pacific Islander
White
Level Four 1.99 5.23 25.9 3.64 8.3 6.49 11.94
Level Three 11.48 17.76 29.42 15.88 22.81 20.77 28.55
Level Two 37.85 42.98 29.21 41.79 40.07 43.11 38.9
Level One 48.66 34.01 15.45 38.67 28.8 29.61 20.59


The data shows that White students have higher percentages at Levels Three and Four and lower percentages of students at Level One in ELA and MATH than any other group besides Asian students.  White students also have lower percentages at Level Two than any other group besides Asian students for ELA, but both African American and Asian students had lower percentages at Level Two for MATH than White students.  

This suggests that race and ethnicity are still strong predictors of student success in Kansas, meaning more attention needs to be given to eliminating gaps based on these factors. 

Conclusion

The KSDE state assessment results for 2016 indicate that about half of students overall are on track for college success.  Data suggests that students in earlier grades are more on track for college success than students in later grades, and that student income levels and students' race and ethnicity continue to be strong predictors of student performance.

Be sure to check out the KASB assessment data tool to explore this data further.