Thursday, December 8, 2016

KSDE State Assessment Data Summary and Analysis Tool


KSDE recently released the 2016 state assessment results on their new Data Central data page (http://datacentral.ksde.org/).  KASB has taken that data and placed it into a new interactive tool for members and others to use.  The tool (which can be found here: https://public.tableau.com/views/KSDE_Assessments/Overview) allows users to filter by program year (2015 or 2016), district, school building, student group (by race, free/reduced lunch status, etc.), subject, and grade level.

The following is a high-level analysis of the 2016 data including some trends and things to watch for.

Overall 


ELA
MATH
Level Four
10.17
9.83
Level Three
31.16
24.61
Level Two
35.32
39.21
Level One
23.33
26.33


As the table and chart above show, approximately 25 percent of all students in the state (including public schools and accredited private schools) performed at Level One, which is defined by KSDE as "student is not performing at grade-level standards."  So around one in four students in Kansas is not performing at grade level.  

About 35 percent of students in language and 40 percent in math are performing at Level Two, which includes students "doing grade-level work as defined by the standards but not at the depth or level of rigor to be considered on-track for college success."  This means that over half of the students in Kansas are not on-track for college success.

Around 30 percent of students in language and 25 percent in math are performing at Level Three, which indicates "the student is performing at academic expectations for that grade and is on track to being college ready," and about 10 percent in both subjects are performing at Level Four, which indicates " the student is performing above expectations and is on-track to being college ready."

Taking this all together, we can see that the Kansas Education System needs to address the needs of the students performing at Levels One and Two if we want to prepare students for success after graduation whether or not they plan any form of postsecondary education.

The data can be examined in much more detail using the tool noted above.  For our purposes, we will look at the difference in performance by grade level, by National School Lunch Program participation status, and by Race/Ethnicity.  

Grade Level

ELA
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Level Four
16.16
13.85
17.32
6.51
6.39
4.78
5.66
Level Three
29.43
39.18
28.75
34.98
32.99
26.25
26.27
Level Two
31.84
33.13
32.14
30.89
33.85
45.57
40.28
Level One
22.55
13.82
21.77
27.6
26.76
23.38
27.77
MATH
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Level Four
18.1
10.25
12.43
9.89
4.99
5.77
6.86
Level Three
35.96
27.13
22.56
23.02
25.62
19.93
17.32
Level Two
30.75
46.1
38.41
41.79
48.41
34.15
34.95
Level One
15.17
16.5
26.58
25.27
20.96
40.13
40.84



The data by grade level shows some notable trends.  

For both language and math, there are higher percentages of students performing at level four in the earlier grades, suggesting the number of students exceeding expectations decreases as they move through the system.  

The percentage of students performing below grade level (Level One) remains fairly consistent for ELA, but shows a large increase for MATH in the higher grades.

The data suggests that 75 percent of students in grade 10 are not on track for college success in mathematics, and that 68 percent of students in grade 10 are not on track for college success in language arts.  

On the other hand, 60 percent of students in grade 10 are on track to graduate in mathematics, and 72 percent are on track to graduate in language arts.  

National School Lunch Program Participation


ELA
MATH
Free/Reduced
Full Price
Diff
Free/Reduced
Full Price
Diff
Level Four
4.39
15.59
11.2
3.86
15.43
11.57
Level Three
22.24
39.53
17.29
16.76
31.98
15.22
Level Two
38.57
32.27
-6.3
41.84
36.75
-5.09
Level One
34.78
12.59
-22.19
37.52
15.82
-21.7




According to this data, there is a 22 percent gap between students performing at Level One for both ELA and MATH, and a 5 or 6 percent gap between students performing at Level Two for both groups based on their free or reduced-price lunch status.

In addition, there is a 17 percent gap for ELA and a 15 percent gap for MATH on Level Three between the two groups, and an 11 or 12 percent gap on Level Four.

This suggests that students from more affluent families perform notably better than their less economically advantaged peers.

Race/Ethnicity


ELA African
American
Am Indian
or AK Native
Asian Hispanic Multi Native HI or
Pacific Islander
White
Level Four 3.02 6.24 18.66 4.14 9.42 6.89 12.41
Level Three 16.36 24.57 37.09 21.08 30.15 27.05 35.52
Level Two 35.9 38.97 27.23 38.9 36.3 41.64 34.43
Level One 44.7 30.2 17 35.86 24.1 24.4 17.62
MATH African
American
Am Indian
or AK Native
Asian Hispanic Multi Native HI or
Pacific Islander
White
Level Four 1.99 5.23 25.9 3.64 8.3 6.49 11.94
Level Three 11.48 17.76 29.42 15.88 22.81 20.77 28.55
Level Two 37.85 42.98 29.21 41.79 40.07 43.11 38.9
Level One 48.66 34.01 15.45 38.67 28.8 29.61 20.59


The data shows that White students have higher percentages at Levels Three and Four and lower percentages of students at Level One in ELA and MATH than any other group besides Asian students.  White students also have lower percentages at Level Two than any other group besides Asian students for ELA, but both African American and Asian students had lower percentages at Level Two for MATH than White students.  

This suggests that race and ethnicity are still strong predictors of student success in Kansas, meaning more attention needs to be given to eliminating gaps based on these factors. 

Conclusion

The KSDE state assessment results for 2016 indicate that about half of students overall are on track for college success.  Data suggests that students in earlier grades are more on track for college success than students in later grades, and that student income levels and students' race and ethnicity continue to be strong predictors of student performance.

Be sure to check out the KASB assessment data tool to explore this data further.

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