Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Key Findings from the KASB Principal Survey Report

KASB recently released the 2016 KASB Principal Survey Annual Report, which provides information reported by Kansas public school districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to the demographics, contracts, and salary and benefits of their principals and assistant principals from the 1995-96 school year through the 2015-16 school year. Over 90 percent of districts responded each year, with responses for many years nearing 100 percent.


The KASB Principal Survey changed format beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Administrators Survey.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.


Below are some key findings from the report:
  • From 1995-96 (or earliest available year) to 2015-16:
    • The average number of principals per district decreased from 4.1 to 4.0, and the average number of assistant principals per district increased from 1.1 to 1.8.
    • The average number of students per principal increased from 358.8 to 400.2, and the average number of students per assistant principal decreased from 879.6 to 865.5.
    • The average number of teachers per principal increased from 28.4 to 31.0, and the average number of aides and paraprofessionals per principal increased from 5.9 to 12.8.  
    • The average age for principals increased from 46.1 to 47.2, and the average age for assistant principals increased from 33.0 to 48.1.  
    • The percent of principals who are female increased from 31.4% to 43.0%, and the percent of assistant principals who are female increased from 26.9% to 38.3%
    • The percent of principals reported as full-time increased from 95.4% to 96.2%, and the percent of assistant principals reported as full-time decreased from 95.4% to 91.2%.
    • The percent of principals that taught before becoming principal increased from 44.0% to 45.9%, and the percent of assistant principals that taught before becoming assistant principal decreased from 59.7% to 57.2% (2007-08).
    • The percent of principals also teaching decreased from 3.3% to 1.9%, and the percent of assistant principals also teaching increased from 1.8% to 2.5%.  
    • The average number of years principals had been at their current district went from 6.4 years to 6.9 years, and the number of years assistant principals had been at their current district went from 5.5 years to 5.0 years.
    • The average number of years principals had been principals at any district went from 9.9 years to 9.6 years, and the average number of years assistant principals had been assistant principals at any district went from 6.9 years to 6.6 years.  
    • Principals’ average contract length was consistently around 1.3 to 1.4 years, and assistant principals’ average contract length was consistently 1.2 to 1.3 years.  
    • The average number of contract days for principals increased from 166.0 to 207.4, and the average number of contract days for assistant principals increased from 173.8 to 209.2 (2006-07).
    • The percent of principals and assistant principals reported with master’s degrees has been consistently above 90% to 95%.
    • Principals’ salaries increased 57.8% with an average annual increase of 2.3%, going from $52,071 to $82,173.
    • Assistant principals’ salaries increased 52.9% with an average annual increase of 2.2%, going from $49,388 to $75,503.
    • Benefits for principals increased from $2,497 to $8,751, which is an increase of 250.5% total and 6.7% annually.
    • Benefits for assistant principals increased from $2,684 to $7,394, which is an increase of 175.4% total and 5.7% annually.
    • The percent of principals with doctorate degrees has decreased from 8.2% to 6.1%, and the percent of assistant principals with doctorate degrees has decreased from 3.4% to 2.0%.  
    • The percent of principals with specialist degrees has decreased from 14.5% to 7.1%, and the percent of assistant principals with specialist degrees has decreased from 8.6% to 2.8%.
    • The percent of principal and assistant principal degrees coming from Kansas private colleges and universities increased from 0.7% to 20.2%.
    • The percent of principal and assistant principal degrees coming from out-of-state postsecondary institutions decreased from 20.3% to 13.6%.
  • In 2015-16:
    • 10% of assistant principals were reported to also serve as athletic director, and 6% as activities director.
    • 2.4% of principals were reported to also serve as athletic director, and 2.3% as a program director or coordinator.


In addition to the report, KASB released the following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:
  • Two Excel workbooks containing data for all years, the first containing information on principal and assistant principal demographics, contracts, salary, and benefits, and the other containing information on degrees and postsecondary institutions.
  • Two Interactive Tableau Tools with all available data, first containing information on principal and assistant principal demographics, contracts, salary, and benefits, and the other containing information on degrees and postsecondary institutions.

These resources are made available to members only, and can be found at https://kasbresearch.org/member-data/.  If you need the password to access the members-only data page, or have questions on the report or the data, contact research@kasb.org.    

2 comments:

  1. How are these numbers possible?

    Principals’ salaries increased 57.8% with an average annual increase of 2.3%, going from $52,071 to $82,173.
    Assistant principals’ salaries increased 52.9% with an average annual increase of 2.2%, going from $49,388 to $75,503.

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    Replies
    1. Because your denominator changes each year. The average annual increases are not the cumulative increase divided by the number of years, but the actual average of the annual increases for each year. A 50% increase for two years in a row does not equal a 100% increase but instead a 125% cumulative increase.

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