Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Key Findings from the KASB Other Staff Survey Report

KASB recently released the 2016 KASB Other Staff Survey Annual Report.  This report includes the data reported by Kansas Public School Districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to Classified and other staff from the 1995-96 school year through the 2015-16 school year.

The KASB Other Staff Survey is new beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Classified Salary and Wage and Teacher Contract Details Surveys.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.

Here are some key findings from the report:
  • From 1995-96 to 2015-16:
    • The average number of custodians per district decreased 18 percent from 11.1 to 9.1 in 2015-16.  
    • Head custodians increased 5 percent from 4.0 to 4.2.  
    • Other building clerical positions decreased 10 percent from 8.0 to 7.2.  
    • Building secretary positions decreased 8 percent from 6.5 to 6.0 per district.
    • Central office clerical staff decreased 13 percent from 4.3 to 3.7.  
    • Central office secretaries decreased 23 percent from 3.6 to 2.8 per district.
    • Food service cooks decreased 22 percent from 8.9 per district to 6.9.  
    • Food servers decreased 18 percent from 13.0 to 10.7.  
    • Non-licensed maintenance decreased 38 percent from 5.2 per district to 3.2.  
    • Licensed maintenance increased 17 percent from 3.5 to 4.1.
    • Non-special education paraprofessionals increased 19 percent from 13.0 per district to 15.5.  
    • Special education paraprofessionals increased 110 percent from 42.1 per district to 88.6 per.
  • From 1996-97 to 2015-16:
    • Building custodian starting hourly wages increased 50 percent from $6.75 to $10.12, average wages increased 47 percent from $8.07 to $11.85, annual salaries increased 42 percent from $16,364 to $23,198, and fringe benefits increased 229 percent from $1,617 to $5,313.  
    • Head custodian starting wages increased 57 percent from $7.73 to $12.16, average wages increased 49 percent from $10.05 to $14.99 annual salaries increased 46 percent from $21,790 to $31,751, and fringe benefits increased 233 percent from $1,699 to $5,651.  
    • Building clerical starting wages increased 61 percent from $6.53 to $10.55, average wages increased 62 percent from $7.79 to $12.63, annual salaries increased 68 percent from $11,377 to $19,068, and fringe benefits increased 238 percent from $1,464 to $4,943.  
    • Building secretary starting wages increased 58 percent from $6.74 to $10.67, average wages increased 52 percent from $8.60 to $13.11, annual salaries increased 58 percent from $14,810 to $23,438, and fringe benefits increased 253 percent from $1,525 to $5,378.
    • Central office clerical starting wages increased 71 percent from $7.20 to $12.32, average salaries increased 75 percent from $8.92 to $15.62, annual salaries increased 79 percent from $16,386 to $29,304, and fringe benefits increased 225 percent from $1,492 to $4,844.  
    • Central office secretary starting wages increased 65 percent from $7.45 to $10.67, average wages increased 64 percent from $9.42 to $15.50, annual salaries increased 65 percent from $18,610 to $30,752, and fringe benefits increased 217 percent from $1,597 to $5,069.  
    • Cook starting wages increased 54 percent from $6.28 to $9.67, average wages increased 48 percent from $7.94 to $11.76, annual salaries increased 50 percent from $10,441 to $15,698, and fringe benefits increased 258 percent from $1,442 to $5,162.  
    • Food server starting wages increased 55 percent from $6.05 to $9.35, average wages increased 49 percent from $7.03 to $10.48, annual salaries increased 40 percent from $7,259 to $10,160, and fringe benefits increased 246 percent from $1,317 to $4,562.
    • Non-licensed maintenance staring wages increased 54 percent from $8.35 to $12.88, average wages increased 57 percent from $10.59 to $16.68, annual salaries increased 53 percent from $22,291 to $34,109, and fringe benefits increased 224 percent from $1,632 to $5,279.  
    • Licensed maintenance starting wages increased 89 percent from $9.01 to $17.02, average wages increased 87 percent from $11.54 to $21.58, annual salaries increased 83 percent from $24,688 to $45,065, and fringe benefits increased 268 percent from $1,567 to $5,760.  
    • Non-special education para-professional starting wages increased 55 percent from $5.99 to $9.25, average wages increased 61 percent from $6.97 to $11.20, annual salaries increased 65 percent from $8,337 to $13,741, and fringe benefits increased 266 percent from $13,53 to $4,948.  
    • Special education para-professional starting wages increased 60 percent from $6.06 to $9.71, average wages increased 62 percent from $7.12 to $11.56, annual salaries increased 61 percent from $8,432 to $13,574, and fringe benefits increased 353% from $1,317 to $5,974. 
    • Average hours per year have remained fairly consistent, with building custodians averaging around 2,000 hours per year, building head custodians 2,125, building clerical 1,500, building secretaries 1,700, central office clerical 1,850, central office secretaries 2,000, cooks 1,300, food servers 975, non-licensed maintenance 2,100, licensed maintenance 2,100, non-special education para-professionals 1,200, and special education para-professionals 1,200.
    • Annual vacation leave allocations have remained fairly consistent, with 11.0 days for building custodians, 11.6 for building head custodians, 8.9 for building clerical, 9.6 for building secretaries, 11.5 for central office clerical, 11.8 for central office secretaries, 6.5 for cooks, 6.7 for food servers, 11.3 for non-licensed maintenance, 11.3 for licensed maintenance, 4.8 for non-special education para-professionals, and 4.2 for special education paraprofessionals. 
    • Annual medical leave allocations have remained fairly consistent, with 11.5 days for building custodians, 11.7 for building head custodians, 10.3 for building clerical, 10.6 for building secretaries, 11.7 for central office clerical, 11.7 for central office secretaries, 9.9 for cooks, 9.6 for food servers, 11.6 for non-licensed maintenance, 12.1 for licensed maintenance, 9.8 for non-special education para-professionals, and 9.9 for special education para-professionals.
  • From 1996-97 to 2012-13 around 20 percent of districts indicate they met with classified staff to determine the terms and conditions of employment.
  • Over 60 percent of districts indicated the superintendent recommended the terms and conditions of employment between 2001-02 and 2012-13. 
  • An increasing number of districts (from a little over 0 percent in 2000-01 to over 30 percent in 2013-14) indicate that the classified staff see the same percent increase as teachers each year.  
  • Between 2000-01 and 2012-13:
    • Less than 10 percent of districts reported some other means of determining terms and conditions of employment for classified employees. 
    • The percent of districts reporting that nurses were paid according to the teacher salary schedule remained around 25 percent.
  • The number of regular drivers per district has been reported consistently between 10 and 12 drivers until 2015-16, when this number dropped to about 9 per district.  The number of special drivers has been consistently between 4 and 6 per district.
  • From 2001-02 to 2015-16:
    • Regular bus driver hourly rates increased 45 percent from $9.85 to $14.24 and per trip rates increased 60 percent from $14.07 to $22.45.  Special bus driver hourly rates increased 51 percent from $7.48 to $11.27.
    • The average number of full-time nurses employed decreased 27 percent from 3.3 to 2.4 and the average number of part-time nurses employed increased 40 percent from 1.5 to 2.1 per district.  
    • Starting hourly wages for nurses increased 34 percent from $15.05 to $20.19 and the average hourly wages increased 39 percent from $16.39 to $22.73. 
    • The average amount spent on contract nursing services increased 98 percent from $19,861 to $39,401.
  • From 2006-07 to 2015-16:
    • Per mile rates for regular bus drivers decreased 13 percent from $0.45 to $0.39, and for special bus drivers decreased 31 percent from $0.54 to $0.37.
    • The number of contracted full-time nurses increased 17 percent from 1.4 to 1.6 per district.
In addition to the report, KASB released The following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:
The report as well as the tools mentioned can be found at kasbresearch.org.  Questions on the report and data can be sent to research@kasb.org.    

Thursday, December 8, 2016

KSDE State Assessment Data Summary and Analysis Tool


KSDE recently released the 2016 state assessment results on their new Data Central data page (http://datacentral.ksde.org/).  KASB has taken that data and placed it into a new interactive tool for members and others to use.  The tool (which can be found here: https://public.tableau.com/views/KSDE_Assessments/Overview) allows users to filter by program year (2015 or 2016), district, school building, student group (by race, free/reduced lunch status, etc.), subject, and grade level.

The following is a high-level analysis of the 2016 data including some trends and things to watch for.

Overall 


ELA
MATH
Level Four
10.17
9.83
Level Three
31.16
24.61
Level Two
35.32
39.21
Level One
23.33
26.33


As the table and chart above show, approximately 25 percent of all students in the state (including public schools and accredited private schools) performed at Level One, which is defined by KSDE as "student is not performing at grade-level standards."  So around one in four students in Kansas is not performing at grade level.  

About 35 percent of students in language and 40 percent in math are performing at Level Two, which includes students "doing grade-level work as defined by the standards but not at the depth or level of rigor to be considered on-track for college success."  This means that over half of the students in Kansas are not on-track for college success.

Around 30 percent of students in language and 25 percent in math are performing at Level Three, which indicates "the student is performing at academic expectations for that grade and is on track to being college ready," and about 10 percent in both subjects are performing at Level Four, which indicates " the student is performing above expectations and is on-track to being college ready."

Taking this all together, we can see that the Kansas Education System needs to address the needs of the students performing at Levels One and Two if we want to prepare students for success after graduation whether or not they plan any form of postsecondary education.

The data can be examined in much more detail using the tool noted above.  For our purposes, we will look at the difference in performance by grade level, by National School Lunch Program participation status, and by Race/Ethnicity.  

Grade Level

ELA
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Level Four
16.16
13.85
17.32
6.51
6.39
4.78
5.66
Level Three
29.43
39.18
28.75
34.98
32.99
26.25
26.27
Level Two
31.84
33.13
32.14
30.89
33.85
45.57
40.28
Level One
22.55
13.82
21.77
27.6
26.76
23.38
27.77
MATH
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Level Four
18.1
10.25
12.43
9.89
4.99
5.77
6.86
Level Three
35.96
27.13
22.56
23.02
25.62
19.93
17.32
Level Two
30.75
46.1
38.41
41.79
48.41
34.15
34.95
Level One
15.17
16.5
26.58
25.27
20.96
40.13
40.84



The data by grade level shows some notable trends.  

For both language and math, there are higher percentages of students performing at level four in the earlier grades, suggesting the number of students exceeding expectations decreases as they move through the system.  

The percentage of students performing below grade level (Level One) remains fairly consistent for ELA, but shows a large increase for MATH in the higher grades.

The data suggests that 75 percent of students in grade 10 are not on track for college success in mathematics, and that 68 percent of students in grade 10 are not on track for college success in language arts.  

On the other hand, 60 percent of students in grade 10 are on track to graduate in mathematics, and 72 percent are on track to graduate in language arts.  

National School Lunch Program Participation


ELA
MATH
Free/Reduced
Full Price
Diff
Free/Reduced
Full Price
Diff
Level Four
4.39
15.59
11.2
3.86
15.43
11.57
Level Three
22.24
39.53
17.29
16.76
31.98
15.22
Level Two
38.57
32.27
-6.3
41.84
36.75
-5.09
Level One
34.78
12.59
-22.19
37.52
15.82
-21.7




According to this data, there is a 22 percent gap between students performing at Level One for both ELA and MATH, and a 5 or 6 percent gap between students performing at Level Two for both groups based on their free or reduced-price lunch status.

In addition, there is a 17 percent gap for ELA and a 15 percent gap for MATH on Level Three between the two groups, and an 11 or 12 percent gap on Level Four.

This suggests that students from more affluent families perform notably better than their less economically advantaged peers.

Race/Ethnicity


ELA African
American
Am Indian
or AK Native
Asian Hispanic Multi Native HI or
Pacific Islander
White
Level Four 3.02 6.24 18.66 4.14 9.42 6.89 12.41
Level Three 16.36 24.57 37.09 21.08 30.15 27.05 35.52
Level Two 35.9 38.97 27.23 38.9 36.3 41.64 34.43
Level One 44.7 30.2 17 35.86 24.1 24.4 17.62
MATH African
American
Am Indian
or AK Native
Asian Hispanic Multi Native HI or
Pacific Islander
White
Level Four 1.99 5.23 25.9 3.64 8.3 6.49 11.94
Level Three 11.48 17.76 29.42 15.88 22.81 20.77 28.55
Level Two 37.85 42.98 29.21 41.79 40.07 43.11 38.9
Level One 48.66 34.01 15.45 38.67 28.8 29.61 20.59


The data shows that White students have higher percentages at Levels Three and Four and lower percentages of students at Level One in ELA and MATH than any other group besides Asian students.  White students also have lower percentages at Level Two than any other group besides Asian students for ELA, but both African American and Asian students had lower percentages at Level Two for MATH than White students.  

This suggests that race and ethnicity are still strong predictors of student success in Kansas, meaning more attention needs to be given to eliminating gaps based on these factors. 

Conclusion

The KSDE state assessment results for 2016 indicate that about half of students overall are on track for college success.  Data suggests that students in earlier grades are more on track for college success than students in later grades, and that student income levels and students' race and ethnicity continue to be strong predictors of student performance.

Be sure to check out the KASB assessment data tool to explore this data further.

Monday, November 28, 2016

Key Findings from the KASB Teacher Contract Survey Report

KASB recently released the 2016 KASB Teacher Contract Survey Annual Report.  This report includes the data reported by Kansas Public School Districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to Teacher Contracts from the 1995-96 school year through the 2015-16 school year.  

The KASB Teacher Contract Survey changed format beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Teacher Contract Details and Negotiations Settlement Surveys.  In addition, many of the questions formerly asked on the Teacher Contract Details Survey have been moved to the Calendar, Supplemental Pay, Employee Relations, and Retirement Surveys.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.

Here are some key findings from the report:
  • Between 1995-96 and 2015-16:
    • The average teacher base salary increased 47% from $23,427 to $34,386, while the average fringe benefits increased 236% from $1,767 to $5,935. 
    • The average base salaries for teachers have increased at a higher rate for larger districts.
    • The increases in board-paid fringe benefits for districts of different sizes have been fairly consistent, with teachers at larger districts receiving more fringe benefits than those from smaller districts. 
    • The largest increase in the average package increases were seen between 2004-05 and 2005-06, and the largest decreases in the average package increases were seen between 2008-09 and 2009-10.
    • The average number of negotiation sessions went from between 5 and 6 to just under 4 sessions.
    • Negotiation session length has been consistently around 2 hours, with larger districts reporting longer sessions.
    • District negotiations costs have gone from just under $2,000 per district to just under $1,000 per district.
    • Total district time spent on negotiations for small and medium districts has remained between 50 and 100 hours.
    • Total district time spent on negotiations for large districts has gone from between 400 and 500 hours to between 100 and 200 hours.
    • Districts reporting impasse decreased from 16% to 4%.
    • Districts reporting joint impasse decreased from 9% to 3%. 
    • Districts reporting that unilateral contracts were issued remained below 2%.
    • The average contract length decreased from 1.2 years to 1.0 years, indicating more districts moved from 2 year contracts to 1 year contracts.
    • Average annual leave allocations by type have remained fairly consistent with the following average number of days per year: Sabbatical 179, Emergency 53, Family 67, All Purpose 10, Medical 10, Personal 3, Bereavement 4, Maternity 26, Legal 3, Association 8, Professional 3, and Other 5.
    • Average daily substitute pay increased from $61.56 to $89.87.
    • Districts paying for unused leave increased from 70% to 95%. 
    • Districts paying for unused leave at retirement increased from 50% to 75%.
    • Districts paying for unused leave at maximum accumulation increased from 30% to 60%.
    • Districts paying for unused leave at death or resignation remained around 30%.
    • The maximum accumulation of leave to be paid for small and medium districts remained between 40 and 60 days.
    • The maximum accumulation of leave to be paid for large districts increased from 80 to 110 days.
    • The daily reimbursement rate for unused leave increased from $30 to $57.
    • Large districts went from paying more than the state average and more than small and medium districts for unused pay to paying less than these groups.
    • Districts with a paid leave bank increased from 50% to 84%.
    • Districts with voluntary paid leave banks increased from 35% to 70%.
    • Districts with teacher controlled paid leave banks increased from 40% to 60%, then decreased to 36% after districts started reporting joint committee-controlled paid leave banks.
    • The maximum number of days allowed in paid leave banks increased from 150 to 200. 
    • Teacher contributions into paid leave banks remained around 2.5 days per teacher.
    • Board contributions into paid leave banks decreased from 71 days to 41 days.
    • Individual teacher max usage of paid leave banks remained around 35 days.
  • Between 1996-97 and 2015-16:
    • Districts with negotiation settlements tied to enrollment decreased from 15.1% to 2.2%.
    • Districts with binding arbitration of grievances in their agreements increased from 7.2% to 9.4%.
    • Districts with tuition reimbursement plans decreased from 18.8% to 22.5%.
    • Districts with limits on salary schedule placements for new hires decreased from 22.7% to 14.6%.
    • Districts including disciplinary procedures in their negotiated agreements increased from 19.4% to 25.5%.
    • Districts including due process language in their agreements increased from 29.6% to 31.1%.
    • Districts including site based management language in their agreements increased from 2.3% to 4.1%.
    • Districts requiring positive evaluations for step movement increased from none to 4.1%
    • Districts reporting that their Board had no flexibility to change the use of contract days increased from 15.5% to 19.9%.
  • Between 1997-98 and 2015-16:
    • Teachers on average used between 6 and 7 days per year.
    • Teachers in larger districts were likely to use more days than those from smaller districts.
  • Between 1999-00 and 2015-16:
    • Districts reporting agreements could be reopened for salary schedule or fringe benefits changes decreased from 6% to 2%.
    • Districts reporting agreements could be reopened for contract day changes decreased from 7% to 1%.
    • Districts reporting agreements could be reopened for unspecified items decreased from 6% to 3%.
    • Districts reporting salary schedules could be reopened for enrollment changes decreased from 6% to 1%.
    • Districts reporting salary schedules could be reopened for legislative changes decreased from 6% to 3%.
  • Between 2001-02 and 2015-16:
    • Districts including FMLA provisions in their agreements decreased from 62.5% to 47.2%.
    • Larger districts were more likely to include FMLA provisions in their agreements.
  • Between 2007-08 and 2015-16:
    • Districts reporting joint committee controlled paid leave banks increased from 50% to 55%.
  • Between 2010-11 and 2015-16:
    • An average of between 6% and 10% of responding districts indicated they offered an “incentive” or “retention” bonus.
    • The minimum bonus amounts have remained fairly consistent between $750 and $1,000. 
    • The maximum amounts started just above $2,000 in 2010-11 decreasing to under $1,500 in 2012-13 and remaining there.
In addition to the report, KASB released The following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:

The report as well as the tools mentioned can be found at kasbresearch.org.  Questions on the report and data can be sent to research@kasb.org.    

Thursday, November 10, 2016

KSDE Transitions from Fixed to Adaptive Testing

The latest results of the Kansas State Assessments are based on a higher quality test to measure student performance, and while that is good news for students and teachers, caution should be used when comparing scores to the previous year.

KSDE this week released the results of the 2015-16 Kansas State Assessments. This year the annual update of the measures indicating Kansas public school students’ performance levels marks a major shift in terms of the type of assessment being used to make judgments about student performance.

For the 2015-16 school year, the Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, put into place computer adaptive testing rather than the fixed-form testing that has traditionally been used. An adaptive test, according to the National Council on Measurement in Education, is a “computer-administered test in which the next item or set of items selected to be administered depends on the correctness of the test taker’s responses to the most recent items administered.”  In other words, unlike traditional tests where every student answers the same questions (or comparable questions if multiple forms are being used), adaptive tests change based on the responses test-takers provide.

There are two key benefits to adaptive testing that make them preferable to traditional fixed tests. First, they give a more accurate assessment of a student’s performance or ability than traditional tests by adapting to each student as they take the test. Second, testing takes less time (or has a smaller footprint) because the adaptive test can assess a student’s performance level using fewer items than would be required in a fixed form.  

The one downside of going to this new form of assessment is comparability. Caution must be used when comparing test results from one year to the next when the content, format or administration of a test changes.  This is true even when going from one kind of fixed testing to another, but is even more true when going from a traditional fixed form to a more accurate and precise adaptive test. Therefore KASB urges that people comparing the 2014-15 State Assessment results to the 2015-16 results acknowledge the significant changes to the testing method and content and the potential impacts this has on the individual and aggregate scores.  

KSDE is working to promote the Kansans CAN initiative by noting that these new state assessments are just one piece of evidence for student success, and that they should be viewed in the larger context of all the success factors, including social, emotional, and civic measures, project and task performance, and  post high school indicators. KSDE also noted that schools will be discouraged from “teaching to the test,” since these tests are tied very closely to the state academic standards and should provide an accurate assessment as long as the classroom curriculums are aligned to these standards.  



Monday, November 7, 2016

Key Findings from the KASB Employee Relations Survey Report

KASB recently released the 2016 Employee Relations Survey Annual Report.  This report includes the data reported by Kansas Public School Districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to Employee Relations from the 1995-96 school year through the 2015-16 school year. 

The KASB Employee Relations Survey changed format beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Teacher Employee Relations, Teacher Contract Details, and Negotiations Surveys.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.

Here are some key findings from the report:

  • Teachers at the bachelor’s level made up the majority until 2009-10, when teachers at the master’s level were reported at 49.7% compared to 48.8% with bachelor’s degrees.  This switched back in 2015-16 based on the records received to date.  
  • Teachers with Specialist and Doctorate degrees consistently make up less than 2% of the teacher population.
  • The statewide estimated number of teachers was between 35,000 and 40,000 from 1988-89 to 2013-14, when that number dropped to 33,000, possibly due to the survey response rate.
  • Teachers with 11+ years’ experience make up between 37.8% (2013-14) and 47.6% (1998-99) of the teacher population, followed by teachers with 4-10 years’ experiences with between 28.6% (1998-99) and 36.3% (2011-12) of the population, then teachers with less than 4 years falling between 22.3% (2011-12) and 31.0% (2007-08).  
  • A total of between 16 and 49 supplemental contracts were eliminated annually statewide between 1995-96 and 2009-10.
  • In 2010-11, an estimated 872 supplemental contracts were eliminated statewide, dropping to 290 the following year then remaining below 200 a year through 2015-16.  
  • In 2010-11, an estimated 937 teacher positions were eliminated.  This dropped to 408 the following year, then down to less than 150 until 2014-15, when it increased to 281 and then to 388 in 2015-16.   
  • The largest numbers in 1995-96 came from teachers requesting release from their contracts at almost 400.  This decreased to just over 100 by 2015-16.  Teachers resigning equaled approximately 200 in 1995-96, increasing to close to 250 by 2015-16.  Non-tenured, non-renewed teachers equaled just under 200 in 1995-96, decreasing to under 100 by 2015-16.  Tenured non-renewed teachers have been between 0 and 70 the entire time, and terminated teachers have been less than 16 per year.
  • Districts did not renew a total of 192 non-tenured teachers in 1996-97.  This decreased to around 150 until 2002-03, when the number increased to 306.  Numbers dropped to a low point of 68 in 2005-06 before jumping up to 413 in 2010-11, then decreasing to 90 or less from 2012-13 to 2015-16.  
  • Teachers in their first year make up the majority of non-tenured positions non-renewed from 1996-97 (55.2%) until 2010-11, when 2nd year teachers were the largest group (43.3%).  After that, 1st year teachers were again the majority until 2014-15, when 3rd year teachers made up the largest group (44.2%), then the 1st years were once again the largest group in 2015-16 (51.3%). 
  • There is very little reporting of cases where teachers request a hearing before the board when non-renewed (tenured or non-tenured) or terminated.  
  • Hearings finding in favor of the board are reported much more often than those finding in favor of the teacher or resulting in court actions.
  • There are more cases where teachers resign than where non-tenured teachers are non-renewed, followed by cases where non-tenured teachers are non-renewed, then cases where teachers (tenured or non-tenured) are terminated.
  • Requests for release from contracts generally decreased from 2000-01 through 2010-11, then showed some spikes between then and 2015-16.  
  • Requests for release that were withdrawn are reported as a small percentage of all requests, with the exception of 2013-14.  
  • In most cases where a request for release was granted, a suitable replacement was found, in less than half of the cases damages were assessed, and in a very small percentage of cases no replacement was found and no damages were assessed.
  • The number of cases where a request for release was denied increased between 1995-96 through 2001-02, then decreased through 2005-06 before spiking in 2008-09.  After this time, the reporting for these cases has be very low.  
  • In the majority of cases reported, the teacher left anyway, with a much smaller percentage opting to stay.  
  • Boards appear to have become less likely to pursue certificate removal in cases where teachers left after a request was denied in more recent years.
  • The number of cases where a teacher was non-renewed, terminated, or resigned and found work is higher than the number of cases where a teacher requested release from their contract, was denied, and left then found work.

In addition to the report, KASB released the following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:
  • An Excel workbook containing data for all years
  • An Interactive Tableau Tool with all available data


These resources are made available to members only, and can be found at https://kasbresearch.org/member-data/.  If you need the password to access the members-only data page, or have questions on the report or the data, contact research@kasb.org.    

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Key Findings from the KASB Supplemental Pay Survey Report

KASB recently released the KASB 2016 Supplemental Pay Survey Annual Report.  This report includes the data reported by Kansas Public School Districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to Supplemental Pay from the 1994-95 school year through the 2015-16 school year. 

The KASB Supplemental Pay Survey changed format beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Supplemental Contracts and Teacher Contract Details surveys.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.

Here are some key findings from the Supplemental Pay report:

  • From 1994-95 to 2015-16:
    • High school head positions increased from 24 per district to 29 per district.
    • High school assistant positions increased from 10 per district to 16 per district.
    • Middle school head positions increased from 9 per district to 13 per district.
    • Middle school assistant positions increased from 5 per district to 8 per district.
    • The number of students per district head centered around 900 annually.
    • The number of students per member or other positions went from around 800 to 600.
    • The number of students per high school head ranged from 55 to 61.
    • The number of students per high school assistant ranged from 124 to 151.
    • The number of students per middle school head ranged from 138 to 156.
    • The number of students per middle school assistant ranged from 231 to 227.
    • Contract amounts for high school heads increased 64% from $1,647 to $2,693.
    • Contract amounts for high school assistants increased 57% from $1,445 to $2,260.
    • Contract amounts for middle school heads increased 63% from $1,227 to $1,999.
    • Contract amounts for middle school assistants increased 68% from $1,084 to $1,816.
    • Contract amounts for athletic activities increased 60% from %$1,727 to $2,761.
    • Contract amounts for clubs and academic activities increased 65% from $1,074 to $1,773.
    • Contract amounts for other positions increased 59% from $1,330 to $2,118. 
    • Hourly pay for most activities went from between $10 and $15 to between $16 and $23. 
    • Hourly pay for concessions/tickets and lunchroom went from between $7 and $10 to $11. 
  • From 1996-97 to 2015-16:
    • Contract amounts for district heads increased 78% from $2,619 to $4,662.
    • Contract amounts for other positions increased 86% from $922 to $1,717. 
  • From 1998-99 to 2015-16:
    • Districts reporting having extended contracts based on daily amounts increased from just over 50% up to 80% then down to 24%.
    • Districts reporting having extended contracts based on a fraction of the regular contract increased from 21% to 42% then down to 9%. 
    • Districts reporting having extended contracts based on monthly amounts increased from 7% to 12% then down to 2%. 
  • From 1999-2000 to 2015-16:
    • Between 92% and 98% of districts reported offering driver’s ed programs for most years, dropping down to 87% for the current year. 
    • Less than 10% of districts offering driver’s ed indicated it was offered during the normal duty day.
    • Districts offering driver’s ed contracts based on hourly amounts increased from 40% to 59% then back down to 40%.
    • Districts offering driver’s ed contracts based on a fraction of the normal contract were reported in only three years, and represented 1% or less in each year. 
    • Districts offering driver’s ed contracts based on a per student basis increased from 13% to 20%.
    • Districts offering driver’s ed contracts based on a fixed annual amount stayed between 9% and 17%.
    • Hourly driver’s ed contracts increased from $20 per hour to $25 per hour.
    • Per student driver’s ed contracts went from just over $120 per student to just under $160 per student.
    • Fixed annual driver’s ed contracts went from $3,300 to $3,560.
  • From 2003-04 to 2015-16:
    • Districts reporting having extended contracts based on hourly amounts increased from 44% to 57% then decreased to 21%.
  • From 1994-95 to 2014-15:
    • The average number of contracts for athletics increased from 30 per district to 37 per district.
    • The average number of contracts for clubs and academic activities increased from 17 per district to 19 per district.
    • The average number of contracts for other activities increased from 2 per district to 3 per district.
    • The number of students per athletic contract decreased from 49 to 44 on average.
    • The number of students per contract for clubs and academic activities decreased from 86 to 82 on average.
    • The number of students per other contract decreased from 923 to 665.
    • There was an average of between 7 and 8 basketball contracts per district annually.
    • There was an average of between 5 and 6 track contracts per district annually.
    • There was an average of between 1 and 4 contracts for each other sport per district annually.
    • There was an average of between 3 and 4 class sponsors per district annually.
    • There was an average of between 1 and 2 contracts for each club or academic activity per district annually.
    • There was an average of just over 2 contracts for non-hourly committee work per district annually.
    • There was an average of between 1 and 2 contracts each for all other activities per district annually.
    • Most sports have seen a decline in the number of students per contract, with the exception of gymnastics and intramurals.
    • Supplemental contracts for clubs, academic, and other activities are fairly stable with the exception of orchestral music, which shows a slight decline.
In addition to the report, KASB released The following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:


The report as well as the tools mentioned can be found at kasbresearch.org.  Questions on the report and data can be sent to research@kasb.org.